What Would Gutenberg Do?

Exploring the relationship between print and digital media

So here's Zeen.

Discover and create beautiful magazines? Meh. I feel misled.

2 years ago

Who says print is dead?

Here’s Mark Hooper at The Guardian looking at how the rise of digital devices and publications might actually be fuelling a “mini renaissance” in independent publishing. Good stuff.

2 years ago - 1

We are not living in a global village, but in customized cottages globally produced and locally distributed.

Today: reading from The Rise of the Network Society by Manuel Castells.

It was, says Rashbass, the difference between “snacking on the net as against the gourmet meal of reading in print”. That convinced him and his team to offer an entirely different experience to website users. Rather than lecturing the audience, they set out to build a community of people eager to participate in discussions with the magazine’s journalists and with each other.

I quite like this analogy too.

Andrew Rashbass: ‘The biggest reason we’re successful is that we are lucky’

Previously: Creating radio for TV

(Source: futuristgerd)

One inescapable fact—yet somehow beyond the ken of almost all digital publishers—is that an enterprise based on a volume ad strategy by definition destroys and denies content and user-experience value, while excellent content and UX strategy is an effective ad strategy. Digital publishers, however, tend to be fully invested in the idea that their product has no value whatsoever beyond lending some inarticulate gravity to the actually important stuff on the page: the ads.

Digital publishers don’t need a cleverer and more elaborate ad strategy. Digital publishers need a value and UX strategy for their product.

from The Emperor Has No Content by Andy Rutledge

(via bookriot)

So here’s something that’s got my attention right now: Zeen
So far, there’s only a static home page, but this new venture by the co-founders of YouTube will apparently allow us to “discover and create beautiful magazines”. Excited to see what it’s all about.

So here’s something that’s got my attention right now: Zeen

So far, there’s only a static home page, but this new venture by the co-founders of YouTube will apparently allow us to “discover and create beautiful magazines”. Excited to see what it’s all about.

We are still sort of creating radio for TV, I’ll admit that.

Ana Maria Allessi, vice president and publisher of HarperMedia from the same article over at Wired.

I think that analogy is pretty spot-on.

Though the rewards promise to be great, the adaptation book publishers must make is far more complicated than that faced by the music and movie industries, which essentially needed to digitize their current products.
Bookmakers must become multimedia companies — creating audio, video and interactive components for their immersive, built-for-tablets offerings.

This article on Wired looks at the struggle of publishers to evolve and keep up with tablets and e-readers.

I think the additional challenge of transforming content as opposed to simply digitizing it actually affords a lot of opportunities for publishers (and authors) in the long run. Yes, the glass is half-full.

This just might be the ultimate way to ‘distribute content’.

ianbrooks:

Weapon of Mass Instruction

Built from a welded frame atop a 1979 Ford Falcon, Raul Lemesoff drives around the streets of Buenos Aires distributing free books to anybody who wants to be assaulted with some serious learnin’.

(via: make / laughingsquid)

(via bookriot)